Hyde Park Est. 1909, A Donald Ross Design

Friday, June 28, 2013

Venting and Topdressing of Putting Surfaces

Following the completion of the Met, timing with possible rain the grounds staff will be applying a light sand topdressing and spiking to aid in drying the surface and oxygen exchange within the root zone. We will be trying to target theses practices around the anticipated rain. Venting and topdressing do not impact putting quality, but help in smoothing and firming the surface.

 

Thank-you,

Pat O'Brien

Grounds Superintendent

 

Wednesday, June 19, 2013

Annual Bluegrass and Putting Greens

The putting greens continue to play well with much positive feedback. Some of the factors that have influenced putting quality have been:

  • Increased rolling frequency to five times weekly
  • Use of a smooth front roller on greens mowers to enhance bentgrass
  • Added sand topdressing
  • Average seasonal temperatures
  • Increased fertility to enhance bentgrass
  • Soil active growth regulator that slows the growth of Poa Annua
Over the years there has been much discussion about the putting greens with respect to Poa Annua and lack of drainage. 15 green is the poorest draining green on the golf course, coupled with some of the highest Poa Annua populations, this green can be a challenge to manage. Today, 15 green (no internal drainage) was almost 10% higher in moisture content, compared to 6 green that has internal drainage. Wet, moist soils and Annual Bluegrass are two significant factors that effect putting quality and consistency.

-15 Green Upper Picture/ 6 Green Lower Picture-

In order to dry the surface of 15 green, a second topdressing was applied to inhibit algae growth coupled with spiking the surface to allow for increased air exchange.

- Spiking of 15 green with bronzed appearance of Poa Annua
-Topdressing followed by the seeding of T-1 Bentgrass-

Over the coming weeks we will continue to monitor closely the health of the Poa Annua, with continuing strategies to enhance the bentgrass on the greens.

If there are any questions please do not hesitate to contact me.

Thank-you,

Pat O'Brien

Grounds Superintendent

 

 

 

 

 

 

Monday, June 10, 2013

Annual Bluegrass

The white hue of the Poa Annua (Annual Bluegrass) seed head has slowly disappeared and now a yellow/gold appearance of the Annual Bluegrass can be noted on most of the greens.

 

The yellow color of the Annual Bluegrass currently is caused by the use of a growth regulator that slows the growth of Annual Bluegrass, coupled with increased and timely fertility regimes and cultural strategies to enhance creeping bentgrass, a shift to higher populations of bentgrass will occur. These strategies will not eliminate Annual Bluegrass but will reduce this weed over time, allowing for increased playability and sustainability.

Thank-you,

Pat O'Brien

Grounds Superintendent

 

Large Patch- Zoysia Grass

The Zoysia Grass fairways at HP consistently have provided excellent playing conditions and is a very sustainable grass with fewer inputs of fertilizer, cultural practices, water and fungicides. With that said, the fairways are off to a slightly slower start this season with the sustained cooler temperatures. One of the few pathogens that impacts Zoysia grass is Large Patch. Below is a photo of Large Patch, theses rings, orange in color range from 1 to 4 feet in a handful of the fairways. We apply two preventative fungicide applications once in the spring and once in the fall, currently we are spot treating for any new blighting that occurs. Warm, dry weather will help the Zoysia recover.

Thank-you

Pat O'Brien

Grounds Superintendent